Modern-Day Christmas Traditions in New York

By | November 30, 2020

We covered the historical traditions of celebrating Christmas in NYC. Now, let us learn more about modern-day Christmas traditions. Do you know how New Yorkers celebrate today?

City Hall tree

The 1957 City Hall tree was 60 feet high, and the parks added a Christmas play, Christmas in New York City, accompanied by a fire band. There was also a visit from Santa Claus, who visited the Christmas tree in the park and the tree in the Central Park Greenhouse. The program was designed by the New Orleans Department of Parks, Recreation and Parks (DPRP). 

Volunteers

In the 1970s, the Volunteer Parks program distributed Christmas trees to volunteers, and 44 trees selected from parks and city facilities across the city went to the Adirondacks. The musical Delacorte Clock in Central Park was also accompanied by Christmas music in 1970. Singing Herald Angels, “and the tunes were hand-picked by The New York Times and The Associated Press Publishing Company. 

The festivities continued throughout the day in parks and recreational facilities throughout the city and continued throughout the summer and fall holiday season in New York City parks. 

Mosholu Parkway

In the Bronx, the tradition of lighting a tree on Mosholu Parkway near the Bronx County Courthouse has long endured. In Riverdale, a menorah is prominently displayed in the bell tower, and in New York City, it is part of the annual Christmas tree lighting at City Hall. 

Corona Park

In Queens, Corona Park in Queens and Flushing Meadows have sponsored Christmas tree lights, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa in recent years, and Clove Lakes Park has installed tree lighting. On Staten Island, the Westerleigh Park Friends are sponsoring a winter festival and tree lighting. The annual celebration at Borough Hall in Brooklyn is well attended and sponsored by the Conference House Park Association. Cromwell Greenbelt Recreation Center is hosting a celebration and the tree will be erected in front of the New York City Public Library in late December. 

Christmas tree lighting

Another tradition that has emerged recently is the annual Christmas tree lighting by the New York Parks and Recreation Department. A model train rolls through the miniature city, which people light up around the tree and make from plants and materials for the Christmas season on the lawns of New Yorkers. 

The more than 600,000 lights are organized in advance and sponsored by the New York Daily News. The lighting of the tree is mixed in color, and the new landmark is often accompanied by curated exhibitions. My favorites include the Christmas tree lighting at the Natural History Museum in Washington, D.C., and the lighting that will be lit on New Year’s Eve in the city’s Central Park West. It is equipped with undulating structures that create a flowing water effect and has lighting and trees in colored patchworks. 

Custom Decoration!

School classes also make jewelry that hangs on the display, and a selection of winter plants is included. Some parks and cities benefit from the holidays – themed exhibitions with fountain programs, including mold fountains. The park and private donors have joined forces to beautify the public fountain by embellishing its features with hibernation features.

Well, this is how New Yorkers celebrate thе holidays. These modern-day Christmas traditions show us how the celebrations have evolved and became what we know today!